New water lines open soon in Ripley

By Martha Jacob –

Ripley Village Council met in regular session on Feb. 14, and approved a resolution to allow the Ripley Police Department to add a Lidar DragonCam, handheld speed detector, to the village.
“We’ve received a few signs about the use of DragonCam already, that will be posted around the village,” Renshaw said. “The company and the village have a lot to do in preparation before the DragonCam actually goes into effect.”
In regards to the new water lines in the village, Renshaw said that the village is now in the last leg of the project.
“Next week there will be more testing for the EPA and if it all passes we should be receiving our letter to operate, and the pumps can then go on line.
“One of the new pumps is worth two of the old ones. We have five pumps,  including the two new ones. These new pumps will do 700 gallons a minute all day long. That’s a lot of water..”
According to Renshaw, this water line project began in 2007. The delay originated because the property where Ripley High School is located was deeded to the state of Ohio and it actually took actions by the Ohio Legislature to allow the deed to be transferred and it took all those years to make it happen.
“We should be completely finished and in operation by the first of April,” Renshaw said. “That’s if the tests come out okay.”
Renshaw said the project actually moved into full swing in 2015 with plans to put in two new wells then pipe the water over to the water treatment plant.
In other business, Renshaw said that the state would also soon be installing a flashing yellow caution light in Ripley where Rt. 68 and Rt. 62 run into Rt. 52. The stop-signs currently at the intersection will be changed to LED lit stop signs that flash. The village agreed to provide the electricity to the signs as well as any maintenance that comes up.
Renshaw said that the village is pleased with the amount of electricity used by the Rankin Star, which is located next to Rankin House and displayed during holidays.
“The star is on a timer and comes on about 4 p.m. then turns itself off at 8 a.m.,” Renshaw said. “Last year the star used 86 incandescent bulbs and in the six-weeks it was in operation we burned out about 18 bulbs that had to be replaced. It cost the village about $238.
“This year we got a real good deal on LED bulbs and we replaced all 86 bulbs. This year the cost for electricity was only $28, and it was beautiful.”
The Village of Ripley is currently looking to hire a new fiscal officer, after accepting the resignation of Heather Hauke who took another job at a Ripley school.