Local athletes advance to track and field regionals SBAAC awards baseball, softball, boys track and field First Team all-stars SHAC awards baseball all-stars Lady Broncos finish as SW District Div. II runner-up Lady Warriors cap off season as SE District Div. III runner-up Impressive post-season tourney run reaches end for Lady Rockets Rose M Crone Strategies discussed to join Maysville/Mason County KY with Brown County communities for economic growth Ripley-Lieutenant Byrd Chapter/DAR looking for new members Linda M Lawson Margaret G Newkirk Gregory R Dunn Sandra L Haitz Wesley A Cooper Everette F Donell Lady Broncos move to SW District Div. II finals Lady Rockets top Cincy Christian 22-1 to earn berth in district finals Lady Warriors head to SE District Div. III finals with win over Gallia SW District Track and Field Tourney action gets underway Russell E Conn Robert T Fisher Philip L Paeltz David Beals Gregory A Smith II William G Mullinnix Patricia Ogden Narcan use becoming a source of debate nationwide Rick Eagan Memorial 5K, Saturday, May 20 Cropper’s time as GHS girls basketball coach expected to end after 21 years at the helm Barnes’ perfect game and big hits lead Lady Broncos to round one sectional win Broncos advance in sectional play with win over Mt. Healthy Kenny B Williams Stephen E Marcum Christopher J Lovett Brandon M Traylor RHS students experience mock accident caused by drinking and driving Ripley Council discusses new Lidar system during April 25 session Warriors claim SHAC Div. I title in ‘run rule’ fashion Vilvens’ grand slam caps off Lady Rockets’ win over G’town Rockets lead SHAC Div. II at 9-4 WBHS dedicates new softball press box Rodney E Berry Erma D Painter Alma Cordes Ronald D Latham Economic development project planned Gerald P Morel Lady Broncos capture softball program’s 5th straight SBAAC American Division title Warriors on top in SHAC Division I standings Lady Broncos take first in Western Brown Track Invite Rockets leading way in SHAC Div. II James E Newman Paul E Funk Alan Hanselman Robert V Nash III Frances L Poole Minnie E Fisher Donovan M Pope Irvin E Stiens Myrtle L Lane Ralph L Davidson August J Pace Carl R Brown Phyllis J Beard Lady G-Men complete sweep of Tigers in SBAAC Nat’l Division G-Men pluck Cardinals, 6-4 Warriors climb to 4-1 in SHAC with victory over North Adams Broncos rally in 7th for 5-4 win over Batavia Blue Jays still in search of first win Annual meeting of John P. Parker Historical Society April 23 Boy Scout Eagle project underway at Ripley Library National Arbor Day event set for April 28 Higginsport enforcing speed with camera RULH Alumni dinner to be held on May 20th Joseph G Bennington Rockets fall to 4-1 in SHAC with loss to North Adams Bronco tennis team tops Bethel-Tate, 5-0 Lady G-Men rise to 7-4 with win at Goshen Lady Broncos’ big bats hammer out 11-0 win over Batavia G-Men showing improvement Keith Shouse Diane L Steele August Hensley Louise R Murrell 5th Annual Rick Eagan Memorial 5K Run/Walk coming up in May Birds of Prey Grant Days 2017 attractions John H Young II Sally A Gibson Barbara Burris Mary Ann Napier Martha L Newland Marlene Thompson Patricia A Firrell Kellie J Berry Mt. Orab, Hamersville students take part in ‘Hoops for Heart’ Eastern players take part in District 14 All-Star Games RULH Middle School bans cell phones Ripley Painters Spring Show April 7-9

RULH Middle School students participate in “Real Money. Real World”

By Martha B. Jacob –

Ripley-Union-Lewis-Huntington’s 8th grade students recently took part in the Ohio State University Extension program, Real Money. Real World.
The program was led by Christy Clary, OSU Extension and 4H Educator and county extension agent for Brown County.
Real Money. Real World. (RMRW) is a financial literacy program for youth. The program has been deemed ideal for students ages 13-16. It includes an interactive spending simulation that provides the opportunity to make lifestyle and budget choices similar to those made by 27-year-old adults. The goal of the program is to increase the student’s awareness of how education level and corresponding career choice influence personal income and financial security.
“This program actually begins in the kids classroom,” said Clary. “During their classroom time they go through the financial literacy curriculum, a packet that the teachers go over with them. Here at RULH, Patricia Skaggs, tech. coordinator and Patricia  Whitaker, guidance counselor at Southern Hills Career and Technical Center  did all the lessons in the class and at the end, each student randomly picks  a career out of a hat.
“That career will give the student a job and a salary which could range anywhere from  a welder to a lawyer, a person in the military to a nurse or a journalist.”
Each of  the students (which are all considered to be 27), may or may not have a spouse which may or may not work and contribute to the income. The student may or may not have children, depending on what they draw when they begin the program.
For the RMRW program, the gymnasium was set up with 14 stations, each manned by either a teacher, or a volunteer from the community. Each station displayed a sign which explained why the student had to stop and visit it. Among the stops the student had to visit were titles like communications, where the student had to choose a cable and internet company, each of which would take away a portion of their salary. Other stations  included costs like child care, financial advice, entertainment, utilities, contributions, housing/rent, food, clothing, transportation and of course the finish line.
“At this event,” Clary explained, “the students have all the information they need including how to use a checkbook, set up a savings account  and balance a budget. The kids must stop at each station  and use their salary to balance a budget for one month. Many of the kids are really surprised at how difficult it can be.
“It really throws them off their game when they have to draw from the chance table where they might have to pay for a trip to the dentist (which they didn’t budget for), or the car breaks down, or they need to buy a Father’s Day gift. All the everyday surprises that they could be hit with. But if they run out of money by the time they reach the finish line, it’s back to the finance station and rethink their budget.”
Clary said that one of the most positive things that comes out of the RMRW program is that the kids see first-hand budgeting a paycheck can be, and how important it is to further their education with  college, a trade school or a certificate program.

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