Lewis recognized by EHS Athletic Dept. Western Brown wrestling team tops Tigers in regular season dual Broncos even at 3-3 Lady Rockets blast past CCP, fall to Bethel-Tate Angela L Shuler John C Otten Grace Pedigo plays cello for class at RULH RULH fourth grade math class hard at work RULH MS students visit Aronoff Center Fifteen indicted by Brown County Grand Jury Rita Tarvin Rocket win streak reaches five G-Men ascend to 4-0 in SBAAC National Division with win at Williamsburg Jays soar to 3-1 with win at North Adams Young Lady Jays improving as season progresses Mary J Yockey Callie J Maynard Windle Blanton Daisy D Nevels RULH HS students visit Jungle Jims Aberdeen Council has busy end of the year River Village Christmas celebration begins SR 41 now open Gast’s three-point shower drowns the Tigers Lady Rockets capture wins over Ripley, Batavia Keplinger signs with Shawnee State Warriors down the Devils, fall to the Greyhounds Broncos edge out Williamsburg, 53-50 Carol S Newman John E Short RULH Elementary names ‘Go Green’ Students RE/MAX Local Experts opens in Williamsburg RULH wraps up ‘No Shave November’ fundraiser Eleven indicted by Brown County Grand Jury Donald C Vance John C Morris Rebecca E Simpson Hot start sets pace for Broncos’ 85-40 win over CNE G-Men get off to 1-1 start Lady Rockets start off season with tough string of road games Basketball Special: 2017-18 Katherine J Wolfe Virginia J Germann Rev Commadora Manning Mona K Kirker Ohio Rural Heritage Association donates to Food Pantry RULH FCCLA attends meeting in D.C. RULH MS students try ‘Tabletop Twitter’ Ripley Village Christmas update Bonita Planck Carol J Wagner Christopher O Richey Sr Five new members to enter WBHS Athletic Hall of Fame Blue Jays ready to soar under Woodward Fischer named to OPSWA All-Ohio First Team of football all-stars High school girls’ hoop action kicks off in Brown County Formation of new joint Fire & EMS District discussed RULH students learn about ‘Global Food’ Personal financial management class at RULH High School Dale G Ferriel John E Slack Nicholas A Arthur Bonnie J Roush Charles E Faul Phyllis A Mills Carl L Watson Marc W Bolce Robert R Moore Robert K King June R Williams William T Ishmael Sr Deborah J Napier High school hoop action begins Fayetteville SAY Girls Wing Soccer Team finishes season among state’s Final Four Devils visit Georgetown for OHSAA Foundation Games Grandfather charged in boy’s death ‘Real Money’ at RULH Middle School Ripley High School celebrates Veterans Day Reward increases for information leading to conviction in Stykes’ murder Ripley Village Christmas update Kenneth M McKinley Vilvens signs with Mount St. Joseph SBAAC awards girls tennis all-stars Layman inducted into Miami University Athletic Hall of Fame SBAAC hands out awards to First Team girls’ soccer all-stars John D Marks Aberdeen Police Department receives ‘Shop With a Cop’ donation Benefit to take place Nov. 17 for Grace Copple St. Michael students take part in Community Soup Supper Voters return Worley to the bench Ruby A Ratliff Donna J Moore Stella M Glasscock Ellen L Gelter Alverda T Guillermin Justin N Beach EHS dedicates ‘Kiser Court’ SBAAC awards First Team football all-stars, winning teams Sizer earns SBAAC American Division Volleyball Player of Year honors for 3rd straight year Broncos to host Blue Jays for OHSAA ‘Jimmy Young’ Foundation Game, Nov. 17

Soybean issues continue

The growing season of 2015 will be one that we talk about for some time to come. The good planting weather for most of the grain crops was followed by six or seven weeks of excessive rain that delayed hay harvest, some tobacco being set, and most of the wheat from being harvested, so that meant very few double crop soybeans, too.

The soybeans that were planted suffered from the excessive amount of water just like much of the tobacco crop and hay and wheat that could not be harvested in a timely manner. Corn for the most part seems to be ok or in most cases better than just ok. The later corn that is grown for silage seems to have been impacted more than the early corn.

Diseases have shown up in many of the crops as a result of the excessive moisture. Some of the diseases are typical diseases that we see from time to time in crops. However, last week I received a call about something that was taking a toll on many acres of the soybeans in the Sardinia/Mowrystown area. Our OSU Extension State Soybean Specialist and I visited some of the fields where the problem was showing up, last week. Unfortunately there was no clear cut answer for what was happening. There could be a combination of things, but what is most likely a big factor is just too much water. The issue flared up after a 2.5 inch rainfall that occurred during the evening of Aug. 19.

If you have not scouted your soybeans recently, it may be worth the trip. Then again, with no answer for the cause other than excessive moisture, maybe you just don’t want to see it. The damage in severe in some of the fields I saw late last week. Yield loss will be significant. The beans are podded and have beans in them. However, the entire field was not showing the symptoms, so parts of the fields appear to be dead and losing or already lost their leaves while parts of the fields are still very green. The areas where beans were dead were already subject to pods shattering.

Antibiotic Resistance: Let’s Change the Way We Understand It

I found this in a recent Beef Blog. This is one of those topics that we really need to know more about, and as it is in most cases, we only hear one side of the story. This link will take you to the full article if you wish to read more, http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2015/08/antibiotic-resistance-lets-change-the-way-we-understand-it/#.VeXOQ02FOM8.

In the past few days, there have been two interesting reports on antibiotic resistance. One was released by Consumer Reports entitled, “How Safe Is Your Ground Beef?” The other, much less publicized, was put together by scientists and physicians who work in public health and do know something about antibiotic resistance.

This second report was published in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report and is part of the Grand Rounds by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. From this second report, I like both the title, “Getting Smart about Antibiotics,” and the fact that the authors present an appalling number of figures pointing out the impact of inappropriate antibiotic use in human medicine.

There is no doubt that the “increasing prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is one of the most serious threats to public health in the 21st century.” But there is also no doubt that this is a complex issue, and pitting one food system against others will not solve the problem. Blaming the use of antibiotics in medicine versus veterinary medicine will not solve the problem either. But for some reason, the discourse about antibiotics resistance has taken the form of blaming somebody or something.

The study of antibiotic resistance is extremely complex because of the variability in the methods of testing for antibiotic resistance and the temporal and spatial inconsistencies in the results. An example of this variability can be seen on the website of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring Systems.

Farm Science Review Tickets

Remember that we have Farm Science Review tickets available at all OSU Extension Offices until Sept. 21 or we run out of tickets. For more information about the Farm Science Review go the website at http://fsr.osu.edu.

Dates to Remember

Sept. 3- Adams County Junior Fair Beef BBQ

Sept. 5-12- Highland County Fair

Sept. 14- Pesticide Testing at Old Y Restaurant at Noon. Pre-register at http://pested.osu.edu or call 1-800-282-1955

Sept. 22-24- Farm Science Review

Sept. 28- Oct. 3- Brown County Fair

http://ripleybee.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Dugan-sig1.pdf

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