Eugene M Jennings Jr Billy R Kilgore Sr Carol D Roberts Thelma L Gray Ripley FFA off to a busy start this year Ripley River Village Christmas adds new events Man found dead in ditch Rev Alvin B Woodruff Jackson L Russell Lady Broncos bring home 11th SBAAC American Division title in 12 years Lady Rockets wrap up regular season Warriors rally for win Broncos make it two in a row Helen L Whalen Veterans saluted at the Brown County Fair Prints available of Eagle Creek Bridge, by local artist Tommy J Stamper Sue Day Broncos move closer to SBAAC American Division title Lady G-Men working hard, showing improvement Sports complex soon to open in Mt. Orab Week 6 football roundup H Ray Warnock Ripley McDonalds robbed overnight Familiar pizzeria in Ripley has new owners Linda Taylor Rene Sizemore-Dahlheimer Eugene Snider Eric Workman Gregory Terry Edith M Moore Eileen Womacks Michael C Jennings Janice K Brunner Cheer squads compete at ‘Little State Fair’ Truck, tractor pulls draw a crowd at Brown County Fair Week 5 football roundup Lady Broncos rise to 11-6 with win over Batavia Broncos buck Clinton-Massie, Goshen James H Boyd Warren A Stanley Jane R Ernst Darrell F Anderson James W Ball Jr June R Paul Robert Kattine Tony W Ratliff Carroll G Boothby Ripley Council addresses roof replacement and paving projects Beasley Farm to remain agricultural forever Janet R Whitt Jacqualine Attinger L Mae Spencer Battle between Broncos, G-Men ends in tie SB Warriors rout Peebles, 60-0 Lady Jays celebrate first victory Lady Rockets on a roll Rockets cruise to 4-0 Broncos celebrate homecoming Sininger wraps up another outstanding regular season of high school golf Joan E Stevens Esther R Kennedy Myrtle Mays Ripley artist to exhibit her works Ripley Police sponsor ‘Night Out in the Park’ Every BIRDY welcome at fish fry Have breakfast with RULH Superintendent Sept. 21 G-Men win streak hits 5 Runners compete at Vern Hawkins XC Invite Lady G-Men stand at 3-2-2 SHAC play begins for Ripley golfers Week 3 football roundup Jays rise to 5-2 with win over Williamsburg Audrey F Staten Rural Heritage Quilt Show winners RULH Elementary first graders take on new technology 2017 DAR Charity Golf Scramble St. Michael students visit “Living Lands and Waters” RULH High School reaches out to those in need Lillian E Cowdrey Catherine A Houk Warriors win Jim Neu XC Invite Week 2 football roundup Broncos unbeaten at 4-0 Lady Broncos compete in Bob Schul XC Invite Ronnie L Day Nettie F Lightner Buildings demolished, Village waits to be paid Ohio Rural Heritage Festival celebrated Henry E Fields Anleah W Stamper Maxine M Garrett U.S. 68 reopens Drought ends for Lady Rockets G-Men rise to 3-1 with back-to-back victories Rockets cruise to 4-0 win over Jays Lady Broncos start off SBAAC American Division play with 3-2 win over Goshen Week one football roundup Preparation begins for Ripley River Village Christmas celebration 3rd Annual Job Fair sponsored by Open Arms*****Always helps Veterans and others

Ducks are edible

Nothing in the world is certain, but life certainly is precious. At first our three new ducks stayed close by their duck house, and did not venture very far into the upper field, but as the days turned to weeks, and they grew more familiar with their surroundings, we would find them waddling farther and farther across the field. Finally they followed the chickens into the woods and headed down towards the creek.

Every evening they would return, the largest of the three always in the lead, and settle down in their house, and I would latch the door safely behind them, until one evening when the middle sized duck did not return. I waited until well after dark to latch the door, hoping that he would come back home, but he did not. The next day I still hoped to see him waddling up out of the woods, but he was nowhere to be seen. I even hesitated to let the other two ducks out, but they seemed impatient to head off into the day, so I unlatched the door and off they waddled.

The next evening only one duck returned at dusk. Again I waited to latch the door, hoping for the others to return, but my hopes were hopeless. The chickens all settled into coop, jostling for the best perch. The pigeons tucked themselves into the top of their gazebo palace, and it was well after dark when I walked out into the field to latch the duck house behind the last of my three feathered waddlers. I fell asleep, saddened with the knowledge that I had failed to keep my ducks in a row.

The next morning I cautiously opened the duck house door. My little survivor waddled out into the day, gently quacking. Several of this spring’s chickens pecked and scratched at the grass close by. The little duck waddled over to join them, shaking his beak back and forth across the ground as only ducks do. I kept a close eye on him all day, and all day he stayed close to his house, joining the chickens when they would stop by, but not hurrying off with them when they dashed away. Several times I thought that I had lost sight of him, only to realize that he had hunkered down in front of the rabbit hutches, looking like a dried branch that had fallen from a tree.

I went out to check on him several times during the day and every time I suggested that he stick close to home and not wander off. I began to call him Stick, as much after the branches on the ground, as my hope that he would stay close by, and close by he thankfully stayed.

And then the lady who gave us the ducks called. She wanted me to know that she had new hatchlings looking for a home, and of course I told her “yes”. When I picked up the box of nine diminutive black ducklings, I told her the sad tale of Stick’s companions. She reminded me that ducks are quite edible.

So I brought the hatchlings home and set them up inside an enclosure out by the goats. I sat down on a log that I placed beside them and I watched as Stick watched them curiously. Whenever a dog or chicken would wander by, he protectively quacked, as if to say “These are my kin”.

I watched as the newcomers scurried about their new home and then finally settled down inside a cardboard box that I placed inside Stick’s house. Stick squatted down close by the box. A dark brown chicken pecked the ground by my feet. A bright red cardinal flew down and sat on the duck house fence. One of my pure white pigeons walked across the bright green grass toward me, ruffled her feathers, and flew back to her mate in the coop.

Perhaps Stick will teach his duckling kin to stay close by the upper field, and swim safely in the ponds we create, and not wander off into the wilds of the creek. I wonder how many creek creatures know that ducks are edible. I imagine that it is quite a few.

http://ripleybee.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/web1_1-Standing-GND-Tailer-sig.jpg

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

© Copyright The Ripley Bee