Angela L Shuler John C Otten Grace Pedigo plays cello for class at RULH RULH fourth grade math class hard at work RULH MS students visit Aronoff Center Fifteen indicted by Brown County Grand Jury Rita Tarvin Rocket win streak reaches five G-Men ascend to 4-0 in SBAAC National Division with win at Williamsburg Jays soar to 3-1 with win at North Adams Young Lady Jays improving as season progresses Mary J Yockey Callie J Maynard Windle Blanton Daisy D Nevels RULH HS students visit Jungle Jims Aberdeen Council has busy end of the year River Village Christmas celebration begins SR 41 now open Gast’s three-point shower drowns the Tigers Lady Rockets capture wins over Ripley, Batavia Keplinger signs with Shawnee State Warriors down the Devils, fall to the Greyhounds Broncos edge out Williamsburg, 53-50 Carol S Newman John E Short RULH Elementary names ‘Go Green’ Students RE/MAX Local Experts opens in Williamsburg RULH wraps up ‘No Shave November’ fundraiser Eleven indicted by Brown County Grand Jury Donald C Vance John C Morris Rebecca E Simpson Hot start sets pace for Broncos’ 85-40 win over CNE G-Men get off to 1-1 start Lady Rockets start off season with tough string of road games Basketball Special: 2017-18 Katherine J Wolfe Virginia J Germann Rev Commadora Manning Mona K Kirker Ohio Rural Heritage Association donates to Food Pantry RULH FCCLA attends meeting in D.C. RULH MS students try ‘Tabletop Twitter’ Ripley Village Christmas update Bonita Planck Carol J Wagner Christopher O Richey Sr Five new members to enter WBHS Athletic Hall of Fame Blue Jays ready to soar under Woodward Fischer named to OPSWA All-Ohio First Team of football all-stars High school girls’ hoop action kicks off in Brown County Formation of new joint Fire & EMS District discussed RULH students learn about ‘Global Food’ Personal financial management class at RULH High School Dale G Ferriel John E Slack Nicholas A Arthur Bonnie J Roush Charles E Faul Phyllis A Mills Carl L Watson Marc W Bolce Robert R Moore Robert K King June R Williams William T Ishmael Sr Deborah J Napier High school hoop action begins Fayetteville SAY Girls Wing Soccer Team finishes season among state’s Final Four Devils visit Georgetown for OHSAA Foundation Games Grandfather charged in boy’s death ‘Real Money’ at RULH Middle School Ripley High School celebrates Veterans Day Reward increases for information leading to conviction in Stykes’ murder Ripley Village Christmas update Kenneth M McKinley Vilvens signs with Mount St. Joseph SBAAC awards girls tennis all-stars Layman inducted into Miami University Athletic Hall of Fame SBAAC hands out awards to First Team girls’ soccer all-stars John D Marks Aberdeen Police Department receives ‘Shop With a Cop’ donation Benefit to take place Nov. 17 for Grace Copple St. Michael students take part in Community Soup Supper Voters return Worley to the bench Ruby A Ratliff Donna J Moore Stella M Glasscock Ellen L Gelter Alverda T Guillermin Justin N Beach EHS dedicates ‘Kiser Court’ SBAAC awards First Team football all-stars, winning teams Sizer earns SBAAC American Division Volleyball Player of Year honors for 3rd straight year Broncos to host Blue Jays for OHSAA ‘Jimmy Young’ Foundation Game, Nov. 17 Vern W Kidd Jr Brown County Election Results – 2017 Michael D Hines Raymond W Napier

Summer refresh for re-blooming Daylilies

If re-blooming Daylilies are cut back and fertilized when they turn brown, they will come back and bloom better than ever.

So-called “re-blooming” daylilies give you constant color for the entire season, unlike regular daylilies. They will rest for a week or two after their spring flush, and then bloom sporadically until frost. The key to their extended season is constant expansion of the root system, since blossom production is directly tied to root growth. This is why newly planted daylilies will bloom longer; once the soil becomes exhausted they will not re-bloom.

Our personal favorite, the frilly, bright lemon-yellow “Happy Returns,” represents this new generation of re-blooming daylilies. The golden yellow “Stella D’Oro” was introduced several years before Happy Returns, so it’s more common. Starting with full, compact, emerald green plants that look like ornamental grass, both varieties are covered with blooms by late May.

By mid-July, re-blooming daylilies have replaced their blooms with a crop of seed pods, and the foliage is streaked with brown. Not a pretty sight. At this point in the season we recommend cutting the entire plant off at ground level, and fertilizing with Espoma Bulb-Tone or Flower Tone. This mid-season haircut and feeding makes re-bloomers bounce back stronger than ever. Healthy plants immediately put up fresh green foliage, and within a month they’ll be covered with blooms once again.

Daylily clumps become root-bound eventually, running out of fertile, loose soil to expand into. After a four or five years, you should dig the clumps up and divide them, mixing Bulb Tone or Flower Tone into the loosened soil. You can cut through the matted clumps with a bread knife or a sharp spade, or pry them apart using two digging forks back to back.

When you plant daylilies (or any plant for that matter) you should dig a hole much wider than you need to, and mix a good time-release fertilizer into the soil as you refill around the plant. Bulb-Tone works best for daylilies, because it’s rich in bone meal and trace minerals that help feed healthy blooms. The better you do at planting daylilies originally, the longer you can wait before you have to divide them.

Daylilies get their name from the fact that each flower bud will bloom for only one day and then wither. Healthy plants have many buds on each stalk, and multiple stalks on each plant, so they provide color for quite a long season even though each flower lasts less than 24 hours.

The daylily is often called “the perfect perennial,” due to its dazzling colors, drought tolerance, hardiness, and generally carefree nature. Daylilies make a terrific ground cover on banks and under fences, crowding out weeds. Re-bloomers like “Happy Returns” and “Stella D’Oro” do a wonderful job as perennial borders. Every garden should have some.

Steve Boehme and his wife Marjorie own GoodSeed Nursery & Landscape, located near Winchester, Ohio at 9736 Tri-County Highway. More information is available at www.goodseedfarm.com or call (937) 798-0239.

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