Grace Pedigo plays cello for class at RULH RULH fourth grade math class hard at work RULH MS students visit Aronoff Center Fifteen indicted by Brown County Grand Jury Rita Tarvin Rocket win streak reaches five G-Men ascend to 4-0 in SBAAC National Division with win at Williamsburg Jays soar to 3-1 with win at North Adams Young Lady Jays improving as season progresses Mary J Yockey Callie J Maynard Windle Blanton Daisy D Nevels RULH HS students visit Jungle Jims Aberdeen Council has busy end of the year River Village Christmas celebration begins SR 41 now open Gast’s three-point shower drowns the Tigers Lady Rockets capture wins over Ripley, Batavia Keplinger signs with Shawnee State Warriors down the Devils, fall to the Greyhounds Broncos edge out Williamsburg, 53-50 Carol S Newman John E Short RULH Elementary names ‘Go Green’ Students RE/MAX Local Experts opens in Williamsburg RULH wraps up ‘No Shave November’ fundraiser Eleven indicted by Brown County Grand Jury Donald C Vance John C Morris Rebecca E Simpson Hot start sets pace for Broncos’ 85-40 win over CNE G-Men get off to 1-1 start Lady Rockets start off season with tough string of road games Basketball Special: 2017-18 Katherine J Wolfe Virginia J Germann Rev Commadora Manning Mona K Kirker Ohio Rural Heritage Association donates to Food Pantry RULH FCCLA attends meeting in D.C. RULH MS students try ‘Tabletop Twitter’ Ripley Village Christmas update Bonita Planck Carol J Wagner Christopher O Richey Sr Five new members to enter WBHS Athletic Hall of Fame Blue Jays ready to soar under Woodward Fischer named to OPSWA All-Ohio First Team of football all-stars High school girls’ hoop action kicks off in Brown County Formation of new joint Fire & EMS District discussed RULH students learn about ‘Global Food’ Personal financial management class at RULH High School Dale G Ferriel John E Slack Nicholas A Arthur Bonnie J Roush Charles E Faul Phyllis A Mills Carl L Watson Marc W Bolce Robert R Moore Robert K King June R Williams William T Ishmael Sr Deborah J Napier High school hoop action begins Fayetteville SAY Girls Wing Soccer Team finishes season among state’s Final Four Devils visit Georgetown for OHSAA Foundation Games Grandfather charged in boy’s death ‘Real Money’ at RULH Middle School Ripley High School celebrates Veterans Day Reward increases for information leading to conviction in Stykes’ murder Ripley Village Christmas update Kenneth M McKinley Vilvens signs with Mount St. Joseph SBAAC awards girls tennis all-stars Layman inducted into Miami University Athletic Hall of Fame SBAAC hands out awards to First Team girls’ soccer all-stars John D Marks Aberdeen Police Department receives ‘Shop With a Cop’ donation Benefit to take place Nov. 17 for Grace Copple St. Michael students take part in Community Soup Supper Voters return Worley to the bench Ruby A Ratliff Donna J Moore Stella M Glasscock Ellen L Gelter Alverda T Guillermin Justin N Beach EHS dedicates ‘Kiser Court’ SBAAC awards First Team football all-stars, winning teams Sizer earns SBAAC American Division Volleyball Player of Year honors for 3rd straight year Broncos to host Blue Jays for OHSAA ‘Jimmy Young’ Foundation Game, Nov. 17 Vern W Kidd Jr Brown County Election Results – 2017 Michael D Hines Raymond W Napier Leslie E Boyle Gary L Barber

Gardening in July

Rain, rain, rain, and more rain! I hope to hoe weeds in the garden tomorrow, but I might have to lay down cardboard so I don’t sink down in the mud. All the tomatoes are blooming and I have picked a few little yellow tomatoes that mysteriously did not make it to the house.

The wet weather has been tough on my pepper plants. They just seem to be sitting “still” and waiting for hot weather. The okra continues to grow, but no blooms yet. The cucumbers are blooming away and I have sliced onions and cucumbers chilling in the fridge.

How is your garden doing? My basil is not enjoying all the wet weather. The deer have eaten all my Hosta leaves down at the cabin and have actually moved closer to the house. The Asparagus ferns in my pots on the porch have been stripped and my poor pansies were eaten to the ground.

I had hoped that the leaves on my Big Blue Hosta would be too tough to eat … wrong.

As I watch the doe with her twin fawns romp around the Spruce trees in the lower yard, it is hard to smile after the destruction they have caused this year.

The butterflies are enjoying the mud around the property. The Zebra Swallowtails were happy to pose for a photograph. They are Ohio’s smallest swallowtail and among the showiest. Their host plant is the Pawpaw (Asimina triloba), a shrub or small tree of rich woods, particularly on stream terraces. July is a great time to get out your butterfly reference book and walk around your gardens.

My favorite Garden Almanac list includes the following tasks for the month of July:

Turn the compost pile – remember to balance the “wet and green, brown and dry”; keep up with weeds in garden beds; water your garden during periods of drought – plants most vulnerable to the effects of drought include seedling, young plants and recent transplants; finish transplanting annuals; fertilize container plants regularly; stake tall plants growing in windy sites; cut spent perennials to the ground to encourage new growth; deadhead flowers to prolong bloom time; cut back daffodil leaves after they turn yellow; continue planting broccoli, cabbage, and cauliflower transplants for fall crops; continue direct-seeding vegetable and herb crops; beginning mid-month, direct-seed vegetables such as spinach for fall crops; harvest onions and garlic after the tops start to yellow and die back; harvest and dry herbs for winter use.

Give your vegetable garden at least 1 inch of water per week during periods of drought. Remember that leafy crops such as lettuce are especially sensitive to dry soil, and will develop bitter-tasting leaves or set seed prematurely as a result.

Have you ever considered planting an edible edging in your flower bed? Lettuce – especially colorful or frilly-foliaged leaf varieties – can be used instead of sweet alyssum, or other low-growing annuals that are often used to edge flower beds.

Now is the time to be taking notes on your developing color schemes in your flower beds. Watch how your garden evolves during the growing season and how you can improve it by adding, subtracting, or rearranging elements of color.

Don’t forget to email your gardening questions to Brown County Master Gardener Volunteer Mike Hannah at mhannah2@msn.com.

I hope that your gardens are growing and that we will all be enjoying the rewards of our labor soon.

Faye Mahaffey is an OSU Master Gardner volunteer.

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