Rural Heritage Quilt Show winners RULH Elementary first graders take on new technology 2017 DAR Charity Golf Scramble St. Michael students visit “Living Lands and Waters” RULH High School reaches out to those in need Lillian E Cowdrey Catherine A Houk Warriors win Jim Neu XC Invite Week 2 football roundup Broncos unbeaten at 4-0 Lady Broncos compete in Bob Schul XC Invite Ronnie L Day Nettie F Lightner Buildings demolished, Village waits to be paid Ohio Rural Heritage Festival celebrated Henry E Fields Anleah W Stamper Maxine M Garrett U.S. 68 reopens Drought ends for Lady Rockets G-Men rise to 3-1 with back-to-back victories Rockets cruise to 4-0 win over Jays Lady Broncos start off SBAAC American Division play with 3-2 win over Goshen Week one football roundup Preparation begins for Ripley River Village Christmas celebration 3rd Annual Job Fair sponsored by Open Arms*****Always helps Veterans and others Evelyn E Smith Peggy A Wiederhold Thomas P Neary Warriors kick off SHAC play Lady Broncos stand at 2-1 Late Devil goals lead to Lady Warrior loss David R Carrington Sr 2017 Ohio Rural Heritage Festival Ripley DAR contributes towards new village flags Rural Heritage Festival event schedule Betty G Schatzman Robert L McAfee Paul V Tolle Herbert D Smith Helen R Little Eugene M Press Lady Broncos out to defend league title SHAC holds volleyball preview Lady Warriors packed with experience, talent for 2017 fall soccer campaign Georgetown’s Sininger off to excellent start for 2017 golf season RULH BOE recognizes Dr. Naylor for years of service as superintendent RULH Superintendent invites public to district open house Bob Groh Memorial Show set for August 26 at Heritage Festival ‘Support Your Veterans’ Car & Bike Show Danny F Dickson Eva J Smith Michael R Stewart Sr Charles McRoberts III Marsha B Thigpen Michael L Chinn William A Coyne Jr Woman found dead in Ripley A girl’s life on the gridiron Rockets face G-Men in preseason scrimmage 13th annual Bronco 5K Run and Fitness Walk draws a crowd William C Latham Over 20,000 pounds of trash picked up in and around Ohio River in Ripley Ripley Village Council approves water plans Steps at Rankin House closed Marilyn A Wren Larry E Carter Virginia L McQuitty Practices get underway for fall sports Jays soon to begin quest for SHAC title Western Brown to hold Meet the Teams Night and OHSAA parent meeting Aug. 8 Norville F Hardyman Carol J Tracy James Witt Ripley officer receives commendation for quick action Bicentennial at Ripley First Presbyterian RULH welcomes new school principals Aberdeen’s Police Dept. continues to grow Mary F McElroy Broncos out to defend SBAAC American Division soccer title Bronco 5K to take place Aug. 5 EHS volleyball team ready for new season Michael C Cooper Raymond Mays Harry E Smittle Jr Mary A Flaugher Western Brown’s Leto excels in Australia Rockets ready for 1st season in SBAAC Paddling, hiking activities available at Ohio State Parks SB Warriors get set to hit gridiron for 2nd year of varsity football Scotty W Johnson Glenna V Moertle Rickey L Hoffer Ruth E Ward David A Watson Janet L Dotson Vilvie S King Steven C Utter Cropper joins Fallis at Bethel-Tate Local kids find success in world of martial arts

Gardening in July

Rain, rain, rain, and more rain! I hope to hoe weeds in the garden tomorrow, but I might have to lay down cardboard so I don’t sink down in the mud. All the tomatoes are blooming and I have picked a few little yellow tomatoes that mysteriously did not make it to the house.

The wet weather has been tough on my pepper plants. They just seem to be sitting “still” and waiting for hot weather. The okra continues to grow, but no blooms yet. The cucumbers are blooming away and I have sliced onions and cucumbers chilling in the fridge.

How is your garden doing? My basil is not enjoying all the wet weather. The deer have eaten all my Hosta leaves down at the cabin and have actually moved closer to the house. The Asparagus ferns in my pots on the porch have been stripped and my poor pansies were eaten to the ground.

I had hoped that the leaves on my Big Blue Hosta would be too tough to eat … wrong.

As I watch the doe with her twin fawns romp around the Spruce trees in the lower yard, it is hard to smile after the destruction they have caused this year.

The butterflies are enjoying the mud around the property. The Zebra Swallowtails were happy to pose for a photograph. They are Ohio’s smallest swallowtail and among the showiest. Their host plant is the Pawpaw (Asimina triloba), a shrub or small tree of rich woods, particularly on stream terraces. July is a great time to get out your butterfly reference book and walk around your gardens.

My favorite Garden Almanac list includes the following tasks for the month of July:

Turn the compost pile – remember to balance the “wet and green, brown and dry”; keep up with weeds in garden beds; water your garden during periods of drought – plants most vulnerable to the effects of drought include seedling, young plants and recent transplants; finish transplanting annuals; fertilize container plants regularly; stake tall plants growing in windy sites; cut spent perennials to the ground to encourage new growth; deadhead flowers to prolong bloom time; cut back daffodil leaves after they turn yellow; continue planting broccoli, cabbage, and cauliflower transplants for fall crops; continue direct-seeding vegetable and herb crops; beginning mid-month, direct-seed vegetables such as spinach for fall crops; harvest onions and garlic after the tops start to yellow and die back; harvest and dry herbs for winter use.

Give your vegetable garden at least 1 inch of water per week during periods of drought. Remember that leafy crops such as lettuce are especially sensitive to dry soil, and will develop bitter-tasting leaves or set seed prematurely as a result.

Have you ever considered planting an edible edging in your flower bed? Lettuce – especially colorful or frilly-foliaged leaf varieties – can be used instead of sweet alyssum, or other low-growing annuals that are often used to edge flower beds.

Now is the time to be taking notes on your developing color schemes in your flower beds. Watch how your garden evolves during the growing season and how you can improve it by adding, subtracting, or rearranging elements of color.

Don’t forget to email your gardening questions to Brown County Master Gardener Volunteer Mike Hannah at mhannah2@msn.com.

I hope that your gardens are growing and that we will all be enjoying the rewards of our labor soon.

Faye Mahaffey is an OSU Master Gardner volunteer.

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