Rural Heritage Quilt Show winners RULH Elementary first graders take on new technology 2017 DAR Charity Golf Scramble St. Michael students visit “Living Lands and Waters” RULH High School reaches out to those in need Lillian E Cowdrey Catherine A Houk Warriors win Jim Neu XC Invite Week 2 football roundup Broncos unbeaten at 4-0 Lady Broncos compete in Bob Schul XC Invite Ronnie L Day Nettie F Lightner Buildings demolished, Village waits to be paid Ohio Rural Heritage Festival celebrated Henry E Fields Anleah W Stamper Maxine M Garrett U.S. 68 reopens Drought ends for Lady Rockets G-Men rise to 3-1 with back-to-back victories Rockets cruise to 4-0 win over Jays Lady Broncos start off SBAAC American Division play with 3-2 win over Goshen Week one football roundup Preparation begins for Ripley River Village Christmas celebration 3rd Annual Job Fair sponsored by Open Arms*****Always helps Veterans and others Evelyn E Smith Peggy A Wiederhold Thomas P Neary Warriors kick off SHAC play Lady Broncos stand at 2-1 Late Devil goals lead to Lady Warrior loss David R Carrington Sr 2017 Ohio Rural Heritage Festival Ripley DAR contributes towards new village flags Rural Heritage Festival event schedule Betty G Schatzman Robert L McAfee Paul V Tolle Herbert D Smith Helen R Little Eugene M Press Lady Broncos out to defend league title SHAC holds volleyball preview Lady Warriors packed with experience, talent for 2017 fall soccer campaign Georgetown’s Sininger off to excellent start for 2017 golf season RULH BOE recognizes Dr. Naylor for years of service as superintendent RULH Superintendent invites public to district open house Bob Groh Memorial Show set for August 26 at Heritage Festival ‘Support Your Veterans’ Car & Bike Show Danny F Dickson Eva J Smith Michael R Stewart Sr Charles McRoberts III Marsha B Thigpen Michael L Chinn William A Coyne Jr Woman found dead in Ripley A girl’s life on the gridiron Rockets face G-Men in preseason scrimmage 13th annual Bronco 5K Run and Fitness Walk draws a crowd William C Latham Over 20,000 pounds of trash picked up in and around Ohio River in Ripley Ripley Village Council approves water plans Steps at Rankin House closed Marilyn A Wren Larry E Carter Virginia L McQuitty Practices get underway for fall sports Jays soon to begin quest for SHAC title Western Brown to hold Meet the Teams Night and OHSAA parent meeting Aug. 8 Norville F Hardyman Carol J Tracy James Witt Ripley officer receives commendation for quick action Bicentennial at Ripley First Presbyterian RULH welcomes new school principals Aberdeen’s Police Dept. continues to grow Mary F McElroy Broncos out to defend SBAAC American Division soccer title Bronco 5K to take place Aug. 5 EHS volleyball team ready for new season Michael C Cooper Raymond Mays Harry E Smittle Jr Mary A Flaugher Western Brown’s Leto excels in Australia Rockets ready for 1st season in SBAAC Paddling, hiking activities available at Ohio State Parks SB Warriors get set to hit gridiron for 2nd year of varsity football Scotty W Johnson Glenna V Moertle Rickey L Hoffer Ruth E Ward David A Watson Janet L Dotson Vilvie S King Steven C Utter Cropper joins Fallis at Bethel-Tate Local kids find success in world of martial arts

Planting for the pollinators

It has been great weather for pulling weeds, dead-heading, and mulching in the Mahaffey gardens. I have a big battle to fight on the hillside at the lower drive where thistles have taken up residence. I am working on a strategy that will take most of the summer, and perseverance on my part, but the end result should be worth it. As I battle thistles in one area, I have been tending to a huge milk thistle in my front flower bed that has unbelievably fragrant hot pink blooms. As my husband (grumbling) helped me plant it last summer, I had to promise that no blooms would be allowed to go to seed. Every time I take my trip around the flower beds, I marvel at the pollinators that are attracted to the blooms.

Pam Bennett, co-author of “Garden-pedia: an A-to-Z Guide to Gardening Terms”, defines pollination as the process of pollen being transferred from the stamens (male) to the stigma (female) to accomplish fertilization. The pollinator is the vehicle that moves the pollen. “It is believed that 80 percent of plant fertilization is dependent on pollinators. Pollinators such as insects, birds, and bees are selective about the plants they will visit. Therefore, great attention is given to using plants that local pollinators will visit and in minimizing any harm inflicted on them.

Are you interested in attracting pollinators to your garden? OSUE Fact Sheet ENT-47-14, “Attracting Pollinators to the Garden” (at ohioline.osu.edu), describes the importance of pollinators, their role in the ecosystem, and actions gardeners can take to help pollinator populations in their yards and gardens. Denise Elsworth, OSU Entomologist, explains that grouping plants together in sunny locations helps pollinators find and feed on desirable flowers while expending less energy in the search for plants.

By observing flowers in the garden and taking note of any flower visitors, gardeners can learn which plants are most attractive to pollinators. Additionally, many plant lists are available to help with the selection of plants for pollinators (find plant lists at go.osu.edu/gardensandbees).

While literally hundreds of garden plants provide important sources of nectar and pollen for pollinators, try these garden-worthy additions recommended by Ellsworth: Trees: maple, crabapple, linden, serviceberry; Shrubs: ninebark, pussy willow, sumac, viburnum; Perennials: aster, hyssop, milkweed, purple coneflower; Annuals: cosmos, marigold, sunflower, zinnia; and Herbs: basil, borage, catmint, lavender, oregano.

Locally native plants attract native pollinators. Native plants offer nectar, pollen and other nutrients in quantities that native pollinators need. Consider adding more locally native trees, shrubs and herbaceous (a plant that doesn’t have woody tissue and dies back to the ground in the winter in colder climates) plants to the garden.

GoodSeed Nursery will present their first Garden Expo from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, June 13, at the Hilltop Event Center (adjacent to the garden center) to offer a learning experience for their customers and to showcase some of their favorite products. Pam Bennett, State Coordinator of the OSUE Master Gardener Volunteers, will be there to promote her new book, the OSUE Brown County Master Gardeners will have a booth, and I will be presenting a program on Vertical Gardening. Be sure to stop by our booth.

The tomatoes are blooming, the lettuce isn’t bitter yet, and the cucumbers are setting on. Life is good!

See you at the GoodSeed Plant Expo on June 13.

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