Stella M Glasscock Ellen L Gelter Alverda T Guillermin Justin N Beach EHS dedicates ‘Kiser Court’ SBAAC awards First Team football all-stars, winning teams Sizer earns SBAAC American Division Volleyball Player of Year honors for 3rd straight year Broncos to host Blue Jays for OHSAA ‘Jimmy Young’ Foundation Game, Nov. 17 Vern W Kidd Jr Brown County Election Results – 2017 Michael D Hines Raymond W Napier Leslie E Boyle Gary L Barber RULH NHS welcomes new inductees K-9 Units and handlers visit RULH High School EMS members honored for service Road work on Ripley streets to begin Russell K Wolfer SHAC recognizes volleyball all-stars SHAC cross country all-stars take home awards Eastern girls finish runner-up in SHAC golf standings Week 10 football roundup Kathleen J Bright Sister Marjean Clement Veterans Service Office Moves RULH MS students hold first Science Club meeting Bald Eagles spotted 2017 Celebration of Lights being planned Carlos L Beck Georgetown XC teams qualify for regional championship meet Warriors advance to Div. II Regional Meet Lady Rockets reach end to successful volleyball season Week nine football roundup Lady Warriors regional bound Amy J Caudill Bertha Lindsey Bobby S Conley Ripley Council considers insurance changes, will be making repairs on Rankin Hill Road PRC Walk for Life raises $4,600 Mary E Hahn Gary R Cornette Week 8 football roundup Notable soccer season reaches end for G-Men Lady Broncos are SBAAC American Division XC champs SHAC XC title goes to Lady Warriors Arthur Smith Eugene M Jennings Jr Billy R Kilgore Sr Carol D Roberts Thelma L Gray Ripley FFA off to a busy start this year Ripley River Village Christmas adds new events Man found dead in ditch Rev Alvin B Woodruff Jackson L Russell Lady Broncos bring home 11th SBAAC American Division title in 12 years Lady Rockets wrap up regular season Warriors rally for win Broncos make it two in a row Helen L Whalen Veterans saluted at the Brown County Fair Prints available of Eagle Creek Bridge, by local artist Tommy J Stamper Sue Day Broncos move closer to SBAAC American Division title Lady G-Men working hard, showing improvement Sports complex soon to open in Mt. Orab Week 6 football roundup H Ray Warnock Ripley McDonalds robbed overnight Familiar pizzeria in Ripley has new owners Linda Taylor Rene Sizemore-Dahlheimer Eugene Snider Eric Workman Gregory Terry Edith M Moore Eileen Womacks Michael C Jennings Janice K Brunner Cheer squads compete at ‘Little State Fair’ Truck, tractor pulls draw a crowd at Brown County Fair Week 5 football roundup Lady Broncos rise to 11-6 with win over Batavia Broncos buck Clinton-Massie, Goshen James H Boyd Warren A Stanley Jane R Ernst Darrell F Anderson James W Ball Jr June R Paul Robert Kattine Tony W Ratliff Carroll G Boothby Ripley Council addresses roof replacement and paving projects Beasley Farm to remain agricultural forever Janet R Whitt Jacqualine Attinger L Mae Spencer

Avian Influenza Disease causes ban

Last Tuesday the Ohio Department of Agriculture announced a statewide ban on all poultry shows in 2015 throughout Ohio. This ban means no poultry (basically anything with wings and or feathers) at the Ohio State Fair, all county fairs, swap meets, auctions, etc.

This is a major issue for the Poultry Industry in the United States. This is by far the worst outbreak in the US. Ohio took a step to attempt to protect the Ohio Poultry Industry from the spread of this deadly problem. I found out Michigan has now been confirmed with a positive find in a wild Canada goose.

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, which is part of the United States Department of Agriculture, is involved dealing with this outbreak. The following is a brief explanation about Avian Flu from the APHIS webpage. (www.aphis.usda.gov). This page has a link for updates and additional information about Avian Influenza.

Worldwide, there are many strains of avian influenza (AI) virus that can cause varying degrees of clinical illness in poultry. AI viruses can infect chickens, turkeys, pheasants, quail, ducks, geese and guinea fowl, as well as a wide variety of other birds. Migratory waterfowl have proved to be a natural reservoir for the less infectious strains of the disease.

AI viruses can be classified as highly pathogenic (HPAI) or low pathogenic (LPAI) strains based on the severity of the illness they cause. HPAI is an extremely infectious and fatal form of the disease that, once established, can spread rapidly from flock to flock and has also been known to affect humans. LPAI typically causes only minor illness, and sometimes manifests no clinical signs. However, some LPAI virus strains are capable of mutating under field conditions into HPAI viruses.

USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) works to keep HPAI from becoming established in the U.S. poultry population.

As far as Ohio and the Poultry Industry, there have been no positive finds in the state at the time I am writing this on June 9. The statewide ban is an attempt to reduce the risk of this devastating disease from impacting Ohio. The following is part of the Ohio Department of Agriculture’s News Release.

Ohio is the second largest egg producer in the country and home to 28 million laying chickens, 12 million broilers, 8.5 million pullets and two million turkeys. Ohio’s egg, chicken and turkey farms employ more than 14,600 jobs and contribute $2.3 billion to the state’s economy. Ohio’s role in national poultry production is even greater considering the loss that other major poultry states are experiencing.

“One of the ways avian influenza spreads is by direct contact with contaminated materials coming from other infected birds. This means that exhibitions, auctions and swap meets where birds are co-mingling pose a high risk of unintentionally spreading this disease. Until we can be sure that there has been no transference from the wild bird population migrating through the state, we need to do all we can to minimize the exposure for our domestic birds,” said State Veterinarian Dr. Tony Forshey.

Locally, there have been several meetings with Jr. Fairboards, Senior Fairboards, OSU Extension, and Advisors involving 4-H, FFA and other youth members who may have poultry projects this year. Discussion has been geared toward what changes will be put in place to permit members to complete their poultry projects at the local county fair without birds on the grounds. Remember there will be NO BIRDS at the fair. This will vary from county to county as the projects are at different stages of completion with fair dates all being different. All club and chapter advisors should be aware of those changes at this time, or very soon. Contact local Advisors or your county OSU Extension Educator for 4-H if you have further questions.

Report Wildlife Damage

Last week I talked about reporting damage caused by wildlife to the proper agencies so we can continue to compile much needed data. I want to keep driving this point home, so keep it up.

I am not sure to what extent, but I can tell you that the issue with Black Vultures has been discussed in Congress. I am not sure of all of the details, but there has been discussion and there has also been discussion involving American Farm Bureau.

Again, we need data to help get something changed about what can be done with this problem. If you have livestock killed or other damage please report it. In Adams County report it to Bill Wickerham at 937-544-1010, in Brown report to Danielle Thompson at 937-378-4424, and in Highland report to the FSA Office at 937-393-1921. Keep in mind, the 2014 Farm Bill has language that may have financial support for damage caused by wildlife that is Federally Protected, so please make the call. You can also contact your local Wildlife Officer.

Dates to remember:

July 7 — Southern Ohio Ag and Community Development Foundation (SOACDF) informational meeting, Cherry Fork Community Center (Gym) 10 a.m.

July 9 — SOACDF informational meeting, Southern Hills Career Center in Georgetown (Hamer Road and US 68) at 6:30 p.m.

July 12-18 — Adams County Fair

July 13 — Pesticide Testing at the Old Y Restaurant at noon. Pre-register at http://pested.osu.edu or call 1-800-282-1955 and go to Pesticide Regulations.

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